A Cornish girl's food adventures

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Gingerbread Honeycomb

Gingerbread Honeycomb

What do you call this? Honeycomb? Cinder toffee? Hokey pokey? Mr Colonial Cravings always laughs at me when I call it hokey pokey, but that’s what we call it in Cornwall and I think it’s pretty cute. Whatever name you have for it, this gingerbread […]

Crochet mug cosy

Crochet mug cosy

A homemade gift is always extra special. It’s the fact that you’ve gone to the trouble to make something for someone rather than just buying them something. This makes a really nice little stocking filler. It doesn’t use very much wool and works up very […]

Gingerbread Viennese Whirls

Gingerbread Viennese Whirls

Oh my word these are good! I didn’t think Viennese whirls could get any more delicious but this festive twist really is good. Melt in the mouth, crumbly, buttery biscuits spiked with fiery ginger and fragrant spices, filled with gooey toffee and rich brandy buttercream? Yes please! Secure your place on the nice list and leave these out for Santa…

Ingredients
makes 8 sandwich biscuits
125g very soft butter
25g soft light brown sugar
125g plain flour
25g corn flour
pinch of salt
1 1/2 tsp of ground ginger
3/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground allspice
toffee
60g soft brown sugar
25g butter
30ml double cream
buttercream
50g very soft butter
75g icing sugar
50g soft brown sugar
30ml double cream
25ml brandy
finely chopped crystalised ginger

Pre-heat your oven to 190°c and line a couple of baking sheets with baking parchment or silicone mats.
Cream together the softened butter, salt and sugar until it is quite fluffy. Sift the cornflour, spices and plain flour into this mixture. Beat this all together until you have a very soft batter-like dough.
Fill a piping bag fitted with a very large star shaped nozzle with the dough. Pipe the biscuits in swirls (obviously) onto a lined baking tray, make sure you leave space between them to allow for spreading.
Bake for 15 minutes until they are lovely and crisp and then pop the biscuits onto a wire rack to cool.


To make the toffee layer combine the ingredients in a pan and heat gently. Allow to softly bubble away for a few minutes and then set it aside to cool and thicken to a soft, spreadable consistency. Be very careful with the toffee whilst it’s still hot.
Beat together all of the ingredients for the buttercream until you have a thick, fluffy, frosting. Match biscuits of similar sizes, spread one half with a little of the toffee and pipe the buttercream onto the other and top with a little of the chopped ginger before gently sandwiching them together. Dust with icing sugar and perhaps a little edible shimmer if you’re feeling particularly kitsch!

Cherry gin and a festive tipple

Cherry gin and a festive tipple

If you follow me on twitter or instagram I hope you’ve been enjoying my recipe advent calendar and have been getting lots of lovely festive foodie ideas! Seeing as it’s Christmas soon I thought I’d treat you to an extra post this week, you’re worth […]

Squash, sage and ricotta galettes

Squash, sage and ricotta galettes

As a non-meat eater I would be chuffed to bits to be presented with these for my Christmas dinner, or for any dinner for that matter! The pastry is gorgeously crisp and flaky against the creamy filling and tender sweet squash. The flavours are spot […]

Chocolate and cherry croissant bread and butter pudding.

Chocolate and cherry croissant bread and butter pudding.

If anyone can think of a catchier name for this then I would love to hear it. It is a bit of a mouthful, no pun intended.
I’ve met quite a few Americans who find the fact that we Brits often refer to dessert as pudding a little odd. We also refer to things that quite clearly are not pudding as pudding (e.g. Yorkshire pudding, steak & kidney pudding, black pudding) but that’s a whole other post! In America ‘pudding’ is pretty much only used to refer to a thick custardy dessert with the exception of bread and butter pudding, although over there it’s just called bread pudding. They seem to love it though, maybe it works so well because their bread is so sweet.
Anyway, I was thinking of how to make bread and butter pudding into something really special. The answer is obviously to add chocolate and use the richest, fattiest ‘bread’ you can find – cue the croissants!

Ingredients
serves 6
butter for greasing
6 croissants (ideally a little stale)
125g cherry jam

75g dark chocolate (roughly chopped)
3 eggs
50g sugar
200ml milk
150ml cream
3 tsp brandy (optional but really good!)
1 tsp vanilla extract or paste

Grease a baking dish with butter.
Slice the croissants in half horizontally and spread the cut sides with the jam. Arrange them in the baking dish, scattering the chopped chocolate amongst them.
Whisk together the remaining ingredients in a jug, ensuring that they are really well blended. Pour this custard mixture over the croissants and then set the whole lot to one side for 15 minutes so that the croissants can soak up the custard. Pre-heat your oven to 190°c.

Bake for 35 minutes, until the custard is softly set. Cover the top with some foil if it starts to get too brown. Leave to stand for five minutes before serving.

Apple and cranberry chelsea buns

Apple and cranberry chelsea buns

You just can’t go wrong with a Chelsea bun. Soft enriched dough crammed full of rich, sweet fillings and covered in finger-licking sticky glaze. Always a winner! I love these warm for wintry breakfasts or with a cup of piping hot tea on a chilly […]

Coconut and raspberry pancakes

Coconut and raspberry pancakes

When I was younger I would generally end up dodging breakfast, much to my mothers frustration I should imagine. I always felt that the extra 15 minutes in bed was far more preferable! I’m quite different now and get positively excited about the first meal […]

Pumpkin chocolate cake (vegan)

Pumpkin chocolate cake (vegan)

When we lived in America people would get very excited about the fact that on 1st November all of the Halloween candy in the shops would be super-cheap. I’m not sure that you could make candy corn cheap enough for me to eat it! We don’t do Halloween on nearly the same scale in this country so we don’t have aisles of cheap candy in our shops but we do get an abundance of cheap pumpkins. Which makes me much happier, as I’m sure you must know by now – I love me some veggies!


The moisture from the pumpkin gives this cake a deliciously rich, fudgy, brownie-like texture without it being too dense or heavy and the spices and chocolate go together wonderfully.
I have quite a small bundt tin which I bake this in but you can easily double the mixture to fill a larger bundt or adjust the cooking time to bake it in a standard tin. You can make the pumpkin puree by simply blending steamed, roasted or microwaved pumpkin flesh.

Ingredients
375g pumpkin puree
50g light soft brown sugar
65ml flavourless oil
135g plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tbsp dark cocoa powder
pinch of seasalt
1/2 tsp ground allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
big pinch of grated nutmeg
handful of dairyfree chocolate chips (optional – but they add a bit of texture)
ganache frosting
50g dairyfree chocolate
50ml coconut cream

Pre-heat your oven to 180°c and thoroughly grease your baking tin. If you’re using a bundt tin then it’s a good idea to lightly dust it with a little flour or cocoa to reduce the risk of the cake sticking.
Blend together the pumpkin, sugar, salt and oil in a mixing bowl until it is thick and smooth. Sift together all of the dry ingredients, to ensure that they are well blended and then briefly fold them into the wet mixture. Be careful not to over-mix it. Fold through the chocolate chips if you’re using them and then pour the batter into the prepared tin. Bake the cake for 35 minutes, until it has risen and a cake tester comes out of it cleanly. Turn out of the tin and leave it to cool on a wire rack.


Make the frosting by chopping up the chocolate and placing it in a shallow dish. Heat the coconut cream until it is quite warm and then pour it over the chocolate. Let it sit for a minute or two and then stir until well blended. Leave to cool and thicken to a soft spreading consistency before using to coat the outside of the cake.

Pumpkin seed pesto

Pumpkin seed pesto

Have you carved a pumpkin for Halloween? Did you toss away the seeds? I hope not, those babies are delicious roasted and hulled. They’re also a delicious (and cheaper) alternative to pine nuts in pesto. Pesto isn’t just for pasta though. I actually ate this […]